What Happens to Your Body When You’re Stressed – Part 1

Have you heard the phrase, “stress is a killer”.  Surely, that phrase should be a wake up call to get a handle on stress. But, unfortunately, most of us wear stress like acomfortable pair of old shoes.

According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, two-thirds of office visits to family doctors are for stress-related symptoms such as fatigue, body aches, obesity and heart palpitations.

These are stressful times for all of us and coupled with our day-to-day stressors, we can easily become affected by stressful symptoms.

When you  have a gazillion things on your to-do-list, you’re overwhelmed by the demands on your time, and can’t take a minute just for yourself,  your body will respond to these stressors as though you are in danger. Your heart rate increases, your breathing becomes faster, and you get a sudden burst of energy. This is known as the fight-or-flight response.  This response is fine if you are in actually in danger.  But, just imagine feeling this way several times a day for days on end.

Consider traffic jams, deadlines, eating on the run, bills to pay, job changes, family and community obligations, endless chores and errands, and demands and more demands on your time, and energy.  That’s the reality for most of us, most days.

How  would you feel if you could take care of everything you have to do and still carve out some time for self-care?

You don’t have to let stress rule your life.

In the next post, I’ll share with you the four areas of your life where stress takes a serious toll.

Gladys Anderson – Life Coach, Therapist, Author

Gladys Anderson, founder of Coach for YOUR Dreams, is a certified life coach, licensed marriage and family therapist, writer and speaker. Gladys combines years of experience, training and a genuine commitment to helping nurses, teachers, therapists and other care giving women to set limits so they have more time, and energy to devote to self-care.

How You Can Get a New Lease on Your Stressful Life – Part 3

stressed womanStress leads to strokes, high blood pressure, obesity, and a host of other serious illnesses.  Did I get your attention?  Stress is not to be taken lightly.  But the good news is, you can do something about it.

Now that you are aware of the toll stress takes on your body and how to recognize stressful symptoms, here are some ways to help you get a better handle on  stress:.

  • Try new ways of thinking – Change the way you think and the things you think about will change.
  • Work on releasing anger, frustration and worry. Worrying about tomorrow or yesterday wastes precious energy that could best be used to tackle the things you can change
  • Learn to say “no”.  A sure way to add stress to your life is to fear saying no. Saying no sets and maintains health boundaries. Learn to say no and mean it.
  • Manage your time wisely.  Keeping to a schedule will allow you to get more done with less stress.  Only commit to the things you are confident you can accomplish within your time frame. Set consistent boundaries around your time. Do the things that are most important to you first and schedule others for later
  • Take good care of yourself.  Get plenty of rest, exercise and eat well.  A healthy body makes a healthy mind!  Don’t be afraid to ask for help when you need it.  It helps to have a strong system of support but if you don’t, there are professionals who are available to assist you in managing stress.
  • Set and maintain healthy boundaries – Establishing firm, consistent limits on your time, energy and resources lowers your stress level.  Don’t take on more than you can reasonably accomplish.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help when you need it.  It helps to have a strong system of support but if you don’t, there are professionals who are available to assist you in managing your stress level.

How do you handle stress? Share your stress tips with us over in the Self Care Circle

 

 

Gladys Anderson, is a certified life coach, licensed marriage and family therapist, author and speaker. Gladys combines years of experience, training and a genuine commitment to helping couples and individuals to revive the love, passion, respect and fun that’s been missing from their relationships.